Wolves Back on the List!

Have you heard the latest on the delisting of the gray wolves?  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency responsible for the well-being of fish and wildlife had removed the wolf from the Endangered Species List (ESL) in March.  That action resulted in the immediate killing of wolves in Wyoming and Montana, a subsequent response of outrage from environmentalists and wildlife advocates, and a temporary court order against the decision.  Now the same agency that removed wolves from the ESL is asking the court to vacate their decision so they can study the issue more deeply.  One may ask why they didn’t think of that sooner???

Jim Robbins of the New York Times wrote in his article, “The reconsideration of the listing was not related to a recently announced decline in the wolf population in the Rockies. Wildlife officials counted 1,455 animals this summer, down from 1,545 a year ago. It was the first drop in more than 10 years, and officials said they were not sure why.”

by National Geographic Photographer Joel Sartore

by National Geographic Photographer Joel Sartore

Previous posts & other gray wolf links:

Not So Fast

Endangered No Longer–Oh Wait!

The Wolf Den

National Wildlife Federation

Defenders of Wildlife

Sierra Club

Not So Fast!

This is part II of the story.
For part I, see “Endangered No Longer — Oh Wait!” April 12, 2008.

For part III of the story, see “Wolves Back on the List,” September 30, 2008.

In response to a lawsuit filed by Defenders of Wildlife, the Sierra Club and other environmental organizations a Federal District Court judge has reinstated the gray wolf’s endangered list status (link to the NY Times article for more information). It seems that there were many of us who were outraged by the decision earlier in the year to take them off the list. Within days of their removal from the Endangered Species List four gray wolves had been shot by Wyoming ranchers, within 61 days sixty-nine wolves had been killed and hunts scheduled for fall 2008 in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming would have allowed five hundred wolves to be killed. According to an article posted on the website for Defenders of Wildlife, Idaho’s state code would allow the killing of a wolf for “merely annoying or worrying livestock.” The State of Wyoming, as part of the plan approved by Fish and Wildlife Service, had proposed maintaining only eight breeding pairs of gray wolves instead of fifteen breeding pairs as required by the federal government.

This issue is not over; this decision can be reversed and you can be sure that the states listed above who were supported by rancher and cattleman associations and the National Rifle Association will be pushing back.

I used this photo on an earlier blogpost and decided to use it again because it is magnificent. In the first post I neglected to give credit to the photographer, Gary Kramer.

Kramer, Gary, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Image Source: Kramer, Gary, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Other links for information on wolves:

The Wolf Den

National Wildlife Federation

Defenders of Wildlife

Sierra Club

Endangered No Longer — Oh Wait!

This is Part I of three entries (so far) on the Endangered Species List status of the gray wolf.

For part II of the story, see “Not So Fast,” July 29, 2008.

For part III of the story, see “Wolves Back on the List,” September 30, 2008.

As you may already know, gray wolves were recently removed from the Endangered Species list. As expected, the great Wyoming hunters took immediate action to protect themselves, their herds of livestock and the deer and elk that they love to hunt and shot and killed four wolves. What a difference a day makes. Can you imagine the angst of the hunters that has built up over the last many years when those nasty wolves could just do whatever they wanted and the hunter just had to stand by and let them? Well, no longer! The delisting of the wolves meant that states took over control of the species. If you go to the article, you read that the wolves had been hanging around a state-managed elk feeding station. So, if I understand this correctly, we feed the elk so we can shoot them and then shoot the wolf who is a natural predator of and might kill the elk that we would shoot. Gotta love the logic.

Want a way to express the distaste you may feel? Friederike Kolbay offers a viable solution: “Save a wolf. Boycott Wyoming.”

Thanks, Mr. Kolbay, I think I will.

(Great site for pics and info on wolves.)